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Local Logging

A logging level of 3 is the default and recommended log level. Radsecproxy will then log successful and failed authentications on one line each. The log destination is the local syslog destination.

LogLevel                3
LogDestination          x-syslog:///LOG_LOCAL0


radsecproxy features a semi-automatic prevention of routing loops for RADIUS connections. If you define a client and server block (see below) and give them the same descriptive name, the proxy will prevent proxying from the client to that same server. Turn this feature on with:

LoopPrevention         On

F-Ticks

If you use Radsecproxy, you should send basic statistical information about the number of logins for national and international roaming to the eduroam Operations Team. The system to do that is "F-Ticks". radsecproxy has built-in support for F-Ticks if you compiled it with the

--enable-fticks

option. If that is done, you simply add an option to all client { } definitions for which you know the country they are physically located in. That typically means all your connected institutions' RADIUS clients, at the national level, but excludes the international roaming top-level servers (e.g. the European Top-Level RADIUS Servers). For an institution it means all your WLAN controller connections. The client definition examples below assume that you do use F-Ticks.

When the client definitions are set-up, the following options enable F-Ticks and send the syslog messages in a privacy-preserving way (by hashing parts of the connecting end-user device's MAC address:

FTicksReporting Full
FTicksMAC VendorKeyHashed
FTicksKey arandomsalt

The ticks will end up in your local syslog daemon; they are NOT automatically sent forward to eduroam Operations. It will depend on your syslog configuration how to achieve forwarding of the messages. For "rsyslog", a popular recent syslog daemon, the following settings will make it work:

# radsecproxy

if ($programname == 'radsecproxy') and ($msg contains 'F-TICKS') \
then @192.0.2.204
& ~

As usual, the IP address above is NOT the actual destination for the eduroam Operations F-Ticks server. Please contact eduroam OT for the the IP address of their server. Also keep your own server's IP address handy, because the F-Ticks server is firewalled to accept ticks only from known sources.

RADIUS/TLS

The following two sections define which TLS certificates should be used by default. This installation of radsecproxy always uses the same certificates, so this is the only TLS section. CACertificatePath contains the eduroam-accredited CA certificates with filenames in the OpenSSL hash form. The parameters below need to be adapted to point to your server certificate in PEM format, the private key for this certificate and the password for this private key if needed, respectively. If no password is needed for the private key, you can comment this line (precede it with a # sign). The option CRLCheck validates certificates against the Certificate Revocation List (CRL) of the CAs. It requires a valid CRL in place, or else the certificate validation will fail. Therefore, it is important to regularly update the CRLs by re-downloading them as described above.

Right now, checking CRLs is discouraged due to a pending bug in OpenSSL regarding CRL reloading.

Replace your paths to the certificate files as necessary - please refer to the "Certificates" section for details on how to obtain and manage RADIUS/TLS certificates.

tls defaultClient {
    CACertificatePath                   /etc/radsecproxy/certs/ca/
    CertificateFile                     /etc/radsecproxy/certs/CERT_PEM__
    CertificateKeyFile                  /etc/radsecproxy/certs/CERT_KEY__
    CertificateKeyPassword              __CERT_PASS__
    policyOID                           1.3.6.1.4.1.25178.3.1.1
#    CRLCheck                            On
}

tls defaultServer {
    CACertificatePath                   /etc/radsecproxy/certs/ca/
    CertificateFile                     /etc/radsecproxy/certs/CERT_PEM__
    CertificateKeyFile                  /etc/radsecproxy/certs/CERT_KEY__
    CertificateKeyPassword              __CERT_PASS__
    policyOID                           1.3.6.1.4.1.25178.3.1.2
#    CRLCheck                            On
}

The following section deletes attributes from RADIUS requests that convey VLAN assignment information. If VLAN information is sent inadvertently, it can cause a degraded or non-existent service for the end user because he might be put into the wrong VLAN. Connected service providers should filter this attribute on their own. Connected Identity Providers should not send this attribute at all. Checking for the existence of these attributes on your server is just an optional additional safety layer. If you do have a roaming use for cross-institution VLAN assignment, you may want to delete this stanza.

rewrite defaultClient {
     removeAttribute                       64
     removeAttribute                       65
     removeAttribute                       81
}
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